Andrew Cooper

Cooper strives to offer a multi-layered, multi-sensory and immersive experience, operating on a number of physical and perceptual levels to achieve just that. 

A fascination with visual optical illusions, time, perceived space and consequence are predominant factors in his work and evoke a dynamic relationship between the viewer, the object and the immediate space. But it is equally apparent that events from contemporary culture, history, along with interrelationships of ethics and morality and how they affect our culture, influence the subject matter of his work.

He does not attempt to moralize or enlighten; his work stabs the eye like a surgical intervention, referencing the state or quality of interconnectivity, of being connected together; and can be further elaborated as all parts of a system which interact with one another and cannot be analysed if considered alone.

Helene Roberts

Helene Roberts is committed to theoretical investigations and eventful practices within urban spaces. She aims to utilise imaginative and interdisciplinary artistic practice to engage with the changing urban environment and its secret histories.

Using psychogeography, art, architecture, cartography, film and performance, Roberts explores the hidden landscape of atmospheres, histories, actions and characters which charge environments, using a variety of media to create site responsive projects.

By placing an aesthetic value on spaces that have been discarded and overlooked, Roberts presents sites of sensory and creative encounter. She aims to construct the conditions in which both the critical and the spatial provoke a ‘turning point’ in the perception of such ‘spaces of uncertainty’ in the city,
advancing the scope of how we think about cities and events.

Richard Gravelle

Richard Gravelle’s artwork primarily takes the form of sculptural installation, often made from clay, paper, and found materials which may relate directly to the subject matter explored in a particular work. Previous works have involved the human form, extending it’s surface boundaries and merging with its environment.

Conceptually, these works are inspired by quantum physics, its revelations about the behaviour of matter
at a sub-atomic level, and the implications this has on our understanding of the nature of consciousness and reality.

Gravelle’s fictional realism incorporates politics with fantasy, often presenting a powerful commentary on contemporary conditions. From a conceptual starting point, the artist selects the appropriate materials and techniques for the work, but the work is only completed during the process of installation, in
which the artist responds spontaneously to the space.

Liz Waterhouse

Liz Waterhouse’s practice is based on nostalgia, loss andmemory. Using the mediums of drawing and installation, her work invites interaction and discovery. She is inspired by the hidden and the curious, creating intricate drawings that initially appear as collective masses, yet on further exploration they disintegrate into individual elements.

This concept is also employed in Waterhouse’s installation works where the viewer is invited to physically interact with the work, discovering it for themselves by accessing hidden spaces, which are often animated by sound and illumination.

This playful aspect to her work allows the viewer to access deeper meanings, revealing metaphors concerning the subconscious and memory.

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Beth Greenhaigh

Greenhalgh’s practice, involving performance and writing, is inspired by dreams, nightmares, scenes from horror films, the animal world, utopia, dystopia, and ruins. Things have been lost, but not forgotten; found and remembered.

The artist is interested in the uncanny, the surreal and the peculiar. Nothing is ever definite but everything here happens with reason, with its own particular logic. The material Greenhalgh uses are collected, foraged and then transformed. A scene unfolds, inhabiting body and space.

Bob Gelsthorp

Generosity and reciprocation are the key driving forces in Bob Gelsthorpe’s practice-based research of the studio as a catalytic chamber, workplace and think tank.

Aiming towards an on-going research of ‘rhizomatic aesthetics’, Gelsthorpe’s work embraces the idiosyncrasies of studio practice; by scrutinising artist-led ethics he aims to allow a greater understanding and appreciation of the generosity of the artist community.

The legacy of faith is the overriding accelerator of his practice; the faith that he had/has/will have in individuals, groups and artist organisations and the faith that they have in him is the predominant reason for his practice.

Jan Bennet

Jan Bennett’s latest Unfelling paintings draw together three themes that have been present individually or in combination within much of her work during the last decade: tree-like forms, visually ambiguous imagery and the use of red art media. They mediate her artistic, technical and personal interests and experiences and are intended as a lament for what has been lost, but also as a scenario for a multiplicity of new and energetic futures and pathways for re-structuring and re-configuring.

The whole becomes far more than the accumulation of parts; the clock cannot be turned back and the dead cannot be brought back to life, but the re-vitalisation of elements and aspects of what once was can produce something with a novel, contradictory and unique life of its own.

Paul Hurley

I Fall To Pieces is one of a series of performance-based works inspired by the loss of a friend in 2014. In the performance I dance naked and blind, wearing only a strange headdress, in a meditation on loss and grief physicalised through experimental movement of the body. I am an awkward mover, and I am exploring my body and what it and I can do in time and space. In times of sudden change, the body is in an unknown territory that becomes familiar, a familiarity that comes into being through repetition. My movements and the work dance in the flux of internationalisation and externalisation, of meaning and
abstraction, of sadness and humour.

There is a mystery and a discomfort that is palpable but not overwhelming. Evocative of ritual and shamanic objects and of primitive art, but also of disco wigs and children’s play things, the headdress used in the live performance is then hung above a doorway in
the gallery, where it remains for the duration of the exhibition. In my solo performances, I work with body, action and ritual. 

Works have often been created as experiments in being – or becoming - in the world, in practices of transformation and encounters of connection, absurd trials to which the body and mind are subjected. Through intense physical action (usually involving challenging duration or exertion) and an interplay of
deliberation and humour, these works are offered as spaces for becoming something other. They attempt to offer spectators an encounter with potential and possibility, with a coming into contact with transformation and a reality beyond the physical and mental. At the same time as being deeply contemplative, there is an absurdity to the work that is disarming and unsettling.

Iwan Ap Huw Morgan

Iwan Ap Huw Morgan’s current practice involves a deep investigation into the artist’s own shadow-self, a study which has its roots in the rituals of ancient Mexicans people, within the Olmec, Toltec and Aztec traditions. Morgan has been an active student and practitioner of these rituals for some time and for him they have become synonymous with his performance practice.

The artist’s intensive schedule of daily discipline involving body work, in combination with ritualized recapitulation and dream recall, is essentially training towards developing his memory in the waking state as well as the sleeping state. Morgan seeks to explore personal history in order to erase it from his life story, to create what is known in Nahuatl as yocoya – a new idea of himself that is rising from the ashes of his past. Emulating the archetype of the warrior and of the wounded healer, Losing It is a new live performance work that focuses on the physical body as a vehicle that carries with it the memories and traumas of self-destruction.

Simon Mitchell

Whilst both artists have a history of producing work in collaboration with others, this is the first time Nicholas Lawrence and Simon Mitchell have created artwork together. With a shared background in software development and an interest in investigating the effects technological processes have on the
mediation of transmission and communication, Nicholas and Simon are creating a series of artworks that will explore these themes and bring together their own open source computer programs with hand built objects that will house the technology that manifests the code’s visual output.

Untitled (One) is the first work in this series; it combines software that collates images from the World Wide Web, based on news headline aggregation. Installed just above head-height, the wooden shelf that supports the iPad simultaneously functions as a display mechanism and an objet d’art, grounding the ethereal nature of the web in a physical world.

Phil Babot

For many years Phil Babot has concentrated on stillness as a way of highlighting beauty in the mundane, to focus attention on the extraordinary in the everyday. This new work centres on the former divisions created by the Berlin Wall and its dissolution leading to unification. By aligning himself along an east/west axis he has chosen to look towards the future, confront the present and acknowedge the past.

In addition to the geopolitical and metaphysical elements highlighted by the piece, the work is also designed to playfully reference the formal constraints imposed by Modernism and its legacy in the way we choose to frame and view art.

Yusuf Rustem

Starting out as a live event photographer establishing a name on the scene working with the likes of Starving Artist, Afro Cluster and Aperture since 2010. Over the past year I have taken a more experimental and artistic approach to photography since joining tactileBOSCH.

Andrew Cooper

Cooper strives to offer a multi-layered, multi-sensory and immersive experience, operating on a number of physical and perceptual levels to achieve just that. 

A fascination with visual optical illusions, time, perceived space and consequence are predominant factors in his work and evoke a dynamic relationship between the viewer, the object and the immediate space. But it is equally apparent that events from contemporary culture, history, along with interrelationships of ethics and morality and how they affect our culture, influence the subject matter of his work.

He does not attempt to moralize or enlighten; his work stabs the eye like a surgical intervention, referencing the state or quality of interconnectivity, of being connected together; and can be further elaborated as all parts of a system which interact with one another and cannot be analysed if considered alone.

Ruby Fox

Jan Bennett’s latest Unfelling paintings draw together three themes that have been present individually or in combination within much of her work during the last decade: tree-like forms, visually ambiguous imagery and the use of red art media. They mediate her artistic, technical and personal interests and experiences and are intended as a lament for what has been lost, but also as a scenario for a multiplicity of new and energetic futures and pathways for re-structuring and re-configuring.

The whole becomes far more than the accumulation of parts; the clock cannot be turned back and the dead cannot be brought back to life, but the re-vitalisation of elements and aspects of what once was can produce something with a novel, contradictory and unique life of its own.